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Upcoming CNR theme issue Vol. 16, No. 1 (2020)

What does the navy do?

What does a navy do during peace time? Good question. The work that the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) does illustrates the classic roles of a navy - i.e., undertaking constabulary, diplomatic and warfighting roles, the three elements of Booth’s Triangle. In defence and promotion of Canada’s national interests, the RCN deploys around the world on diverse missions. Despite the fact that there is no state-on-state war right now - and we hope that there won’t be one - navies must continue to train in case there is a war, and in peace time they provide a means of ensuring order at sea and maintaining alliances/undertaking goodwill missions.

VDQ

While COVID-19 has meant the reduction or cancellation of some of the navy’s exercises and operations, it has been extremely active over the past few years, and will be again. There is a Naval Association of Canada Briefing Note that offers a snapshot of some of the RCN’s major exercises and operations in 2019. This provides a glimpse of the kinds of missions the Canadian navy undertakes and the demanding deployment schedule of the fleet.

Read more: NAC BN #4 (.pdf)

Canadian Naval Review (CNR) - Vol. 15.3

Volume 15, Number 3 (2020)

The winter issue is filled with an interesting selection of articles and commentaries. We start with the essay that won the 2019 essay contest, “On the Rise of the Materialists and the Decline of Naval Thought in the RCN.”

Our second article examines the new Chinese White Paper on defence, and the implications of its new aggressive tone. A third article looks at why Canada has not taken a more formal stance on freedom of navigation operations in Asia.

A final article examines the development of hypersonic weapons and how the RCN should prepare to address these new weapons.

Read more: Vol. 15, No. 3

We also have some very interesting commentaries, and an interview with Dr. James Boutilier, a long-time Asia/Indo-Pacific specialist, who retired in the fall.

And of course we also have our fascinating regular columns, book reviews and amazing photos. If you don’t have a subscription yet, you should get one so you don’t miss anything. As always, keep your eyes on the CNR Twitter account for the latest updates at CdnNavalReview

Previous CNR issues

Volume 15, Number 2, Fall 2019

Volume 15, Number 2, Fall 2019

The fall issue developed a focus on the Arctic. Highlights:

  • Chinese ship Xue Long visited the Arctic in 2017;
  • Arctic Rangers;
  • US Navy in the Arctic;
  • Dollars and Sense: Stepping up in the Arctic.

Volume 15, Number 1, Spring 2019

Volume 15, Number 1, Spring 2019

In the spring issue we have an article that waxes poetic about the retirement of the Sea Kings after 55 years. Among other topics:

  • Evaluating Justin Trudeau's Shipbuilding Record;
  • Strategic Contribution of the Harry DeWolf Class;
  • Pirates of Venezuela and Worrying Parallels with Somalia;
  • Ships, Sailors and Pawns (crisis in Ukraine).

CNR resources

Read more: CNR Archives (50+ magazines in PDF) and Subject Index (500+ articles).

CNMT essay

Submissions to the CNMT Essay Competition

Deadline: 30 September 2020

Canadian Naval Review holds its annual essay competition. A prize of $1,000 is awarded for the best essay, provided by the Canadian Naval Memorial Trust. The winning essay will be published in CNR. (Other non-winning essays will also be considered for publication, subject to editorial review.)