industral regional benefits

7 posts

Can the shipbuilding strategy withstand an economic recession?

In just a few days (or weeks?) an announcement will be made about the decision on which shipyards will be chosen as the ‘winners’ of the two main components of the NSPS.  There will be equal amounts of happiness and furore over the outcome, and maybe even a lawsuit or […]

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Points of comparison for Canada from Australia

I recently came across the Australian Strategic Policy Institute [ASPI] Special Report Issue 31, dated 31 May 2010 and entitled Naval gazing: The future of Australia’s naval shipbuilding and repair sector.  (You can download a pdf of the document from the ASPI website here.)  The report does a good job […]

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Further Thoughts on Requirements

The recent comments by Denis Stairs and Eric Lerhe on my initial offering on the future requirements for a new Canadian shipbuilding initiative made me realize that we were all looking for the same thing: a steady-state, government fleet replacement program. With a flash of deja vu (all over again, […]

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A teamwork approach will be most productive

Peter Haydon has provided strong arguments for shipbuilding to be a large part of the government’s infrastructure package.  President Roosevelt’s 1932 shipbuilding initiative indeed provided jobs, stimulated the economy, and addressed a strategic need for American warships.   Peter very nicely underlines how the same needs exist in Canada today.  As […]

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The Political economics, and the economic politics, of Peter Haydon’s proposal

Peter Haydon has seized on the need for a significant government response to the current economic crisis to make a powerful case for initiating a stabilized ‘made-in-Canada’ programme for the on-going construction of new naval vessels. His proposal is impressively persuasive, and there is no question that the ‘stop-go’ pattern […]

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Arguments for increased investment in the Joint Support Ship Project

The Government is presently debating whether to buy two or three of the Joint Support Ships, and how to resolve its bidding dilemma. Both teams, led respectively by SNC-Lavalin Profac Inc. and Thyssen Krupp Marine Systems Canada, were unable to deliver three ships for the amount stipulated by the government. […]

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