fleet force structure

22 posts

The New U.S. Maritime Strategy: What are the implications for Canada?

The U.S. Navy, Coast Guard and Marine Corps announced the first collective declaration of national maritime strategy on 17 October.  To date, commentaries on the strategy are mixed.  While much of the strategy’s main elements are recognizable (forward presence, deterrence, sea control and power projection), among the new features of […]

Share

The navy’s future fleet plans are not what Canada needs

The navy Canadians have today is NOT the navy that the country has decided it necessarily needs.  The naval leadership is singularly focused on a blue water force centred on the destroyer/frigate task group.  Such a force is capable of global deployments and providing “leadership” at sea.  Proponents of this […]

Share

A Reply to Dave Perry

I read Mr. Perry’s Broadside commentary “A Sub Too Far” with attention and interest. In terms of your reflections on public perception vis-à-vis submarines (“there will be little public appetite for retaining submarines”)  I would begin by responding that it is a government responsibility — regardless of public opinion — […]

Share

Where do submarines ‘fit’ in future navy plans?

Murray Brewster’s article [The Globe and Mail, “DND may be shopping for new subs, sources say”] casts an interesting light on the future of Canada’s submarine fleet. The existing four Victoria-class submarines are consuming the largest portion of the navy’s maintenance budget. A midlife refit to keep them operating into […]

Share

Are SSN’s essential to ensure Canada’s arctic sovereignty? (II)

I am in the same camp as Brian Wentzell on this issue, To me, the possibility of Canada acquiring nuclear submarines is an impossibility. We tried this one time before and the government – and the people-recoiled, some through knowledge, some through fear, some through true intellectual ignorance (except that […]

Share

Crewing of the A/OPV by reservists won’t be easy (II)

AI can sense the previous post will generate interest because Derek Carroll raises some very real concerns. They include the fact that: both the regular navy and the reserve navy are having manning problems the long training times of engineers and techs will continue to complicate this much of our […]

Share

The absence of Canadian naval policy is worrisome

Canada’s maritime interests at home and overseas are changing. On one hand, the effects of global warming on the Arctic Ocean and the lengthening of the shipping season there coupled with concerns for national security especially in isolated parts of the Canadian coast will demand a higher level of surveillance […]

Share

History challenges uniformity in fleet structure and capability

In Defence Watch an unnamed Canadian naval officer laments that the lack of progress on naval construction and refitting will result in the navy being short on “major warships,” which he categorizes as destroyers and frigates, in the foreseeable future. The officer says that delaying this critical work will leave […]

Share

Debating Defence and Naval Policy (XXVII)

With all due respect I think you are overlooking a couple of key points. A “simple” ship is just that — a simple ship, able only to do simple tasks. The operational requirements (perhaps imperatives) of the north, based on the high probability that those waters will slowly open-up for […]

Share