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Volume 15, Number 2, Fall 2019

Volume 15, Number 2, Fall 2019

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The fall issue developed a focus on the Arctic. We have four articles on the Arctic. We start with a ride-along with Nigel Greenwood on the Chinese ship Xue Long as it visited the Arctic in 2017. We have an article that looks at community-based marine capabilities in the Arctic – an article that gives us our cover photo – and argues that Canada shouldn’t focus on the Arctic Rangers to the exclusion of other community-based groups working in the region.

Next we have an article that responds to an article in a previous issue of CNR. This article disagrees that Canada needs to worry about China’s ambitions in the Arctic – and argues that it’s Russia that should be concerned about China in the Arctic, not Canada.

And our final article discusses the surface assets of the US Navy in the Arctic. What role does the USN surface fleet have, and what roles and capabilities should it have? We also have some very interesting commentaries – a passionate argument about putting some navy back in the curriculum of the Royal Military College, a lament for the fate of the Royal Navy, and a discussion of Arctic amphibious capabilities for Canada.

MCDV photo Hfx

And of course we also have our always-fascinating regular columns, book reviews and amazing photos

Table of Contents

  • Editorial: A Perspective on Canada's Three Shipyard Decision - Elinor Sloan
  • Voyage of Xue Long in the Northwest Passage 2017 - Nigel Greenwood
  • Bolstering Community-Based Marine Capabilities in the Canadian Arctic - Peter Kikkert and P. Whitney Lackenbauer
  • China's Mahanian Arctic Ambitions: Second Thoughts - Adam Lajeunesse
  • A Surface Presence for the US Navy in the Arctic? - Troy J. Bouffard and Cameron D. Carlson
  • A View from the West: Strengthening the Indo-Japanese Partnership to Counter the Belt and Road Initiative - Bavneet Mand
  • Dollars and Sense: Stepping up in the Arctic - Dave Perry

Making Waves

  • Putting Some Navy Back in the Royal Military College - Jim Carruthers
  • "Jam Yesterday and Jam Tomorrow, but Never Jam Today" - VAdm (ret'd) Sir Jeremy Blackham
  • Arctic Amphibious Capabilities for Canada? - Colonel (re't) Brian K. Wentzell

Book reviews

  • Stranded: Alaska’s Worst Maritime Disaster Nearly Happened Twice, by Aaron Saunders, Toronto: Dundurn, 2015, 114 pages, $19.99 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-45973-154-7 - Reviewed by Steven Bright
  • The US Naval Institute on Marine Corps Aviation, edited by Th omas J. Cutler, Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2016, 165 pages, $USD 18.85 (soft cover), ISBN 978-1-68247-040-4 - Reviewed by Colonel (Ret’d) P.J. Williams
  • Jutland: The Unfinished Battle, by Nicholas Jellicoe, Barnsley, South Yorkshire: Seaforth Publishing, 2016, 424 pages, $11.62 (soft cover), ISBN 978-1-5267-3728-1 - Reviewed by Colonel (Ret’d) P.J. Williams

Volume 15, Number 1, Spring 2019

Volume 15, Number 1, Spring 2019

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In the spring issue we have an article that waxes poetic about the retirement of the Sea Kings after 55 years. We’ve included an article that argues that Canada should consider the port in Churchill, Manitoba, as a possible base for the navy in the Arctic. As well, we have an article discussing the utility and capability of the Harry DeWolf-class Arctic Offshore Patrol Vessels. And, for your pleasure, we have an interview with Commodore Darren Garnier who was commander of Joint Task Force 150 until the handover of command to Pakistan in April.

Dave Perry’s column is likely to raise eyebrows. He gives us the data – no fake news here – and shows that the record of the Trudeau government has exceeded expectations and the government is in fact very shipbuilding friendly. Its commitment to recapitalizing the navy fleet has meant serious money has been allocated to the National Shipbuilding Strategy.

Making Waves contains a discussion about how Australia should spend more time thinking about the Indian Ocean rather than just the Pacific Ocean. We also have a commentary on ‘future-proofing’ the Type 26 frigates that are about to built, and a commentary on using the Chinese behaviour in the Antarctic as a warning for how it might behave in the Arctic. The final commentary in Making Waves is an examination of the Russian seizure of the Ukrainian naval ships and sailors in November 2018. The sailors remain in a Russian prison, the ships remain in Russian hands – what justification can Russia make for its actions?

UKR ship in Azov Sea

Table of Contents

  • Editorial: Innovation: Top Down or Bottom Up? - Colonel (ret'd) John Orr
  • Sailing to Byzantium: A Eulogy to the Sea King - Jeff Tasseron
  • Third Base: The Case for CFB Churchill - José Assis Giammaria
  • The Strategic Contribution of the Harry DeWolf Class to Canadian Defence and Security - Gaëlle Rivard Piché and LCdr James Brun
  • Canada Concludes Fourth Command of CTF 150 Interview with Commodore Darren Garnier
  • A View from the West: Pirates of Venezuela and Worrying Parallels with Somalia - Francesca Guetchev
  • Dollars and Sense: Evaluating Justin Trudeau's Shipbuilding Record - Dave Perry
  • Warship Developments: Large Surface Combatants - Doug Thomas

Making Waves

  • Sea Blindness and Australia's Second Sea - Brian K. Wentzell
  • Ships, Sailors and Pawns (crisis in Ukraine) - Ann Griffiths
  • 'Future-Proofing' the Type 26 Frigate - David Dunlop
  • China and Antarctica: A Lesson for Canada? - Brian K. Wentzell

Book reviews

  • Marine Corps at War, edited by Th omas J. Cutler (Series Editor), US Naval Institute Series, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 2016, 176 pages, $21.95 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-68247-042-8 - Reviewed by Michael Kocsis
  • Naval Command, edited by Th omas J. Cutler (Series Editor), US Naval Institute Series, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 2015, 192 pages, $21.95 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-61251-889-3 - Reviewed by Michael Kocsis

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