Canadian Marines and Amphibious Ships


Canada’s Future Submarines 1

Canadian submarine interests are extremely relevant, and can be divided into three categories: the defence of Canada and North America; supporting Canadian expeditionary deployments; and supporting Canada’s interest in global maritime stability. If the Canadian government does not invest in a modern submarine capability, its navy will not be able […]

Share

Saudi Arabia purchases two French Mistrals for Egypt

When the conflict in south-eastern Ukraine flared up, a contract signed in 2010 for the French shipbuilder DCNS to build two French Mitral-class amphibious ships for the Russian navy was cancelled. David Pugliese, among others, commented that Canada was an interested buyer for the two ships. These comments, along with […]

Share

Comments about purpose and roles

I was surprised that David Perry’s commentary “The New Marine Commando Regiment” didn’t cover several policy ideas being kicked around within several riding associations. The purpose of such a regiment is to fulfil two roles: First – the development of expeditionary forces is to protect Canada’s national security and economic […]

Share

Whose ‘Big Honking Ships’ are those on the horizon?

Reports, all unsubstantiated so far, continue to surface about the possibility of Canada acquiring a ship or ships capable of amphibious operations.  (See: “Big Honkin’ Ships” by Chris MacLean in issue 5/2010, pp. 14-15, of Frontline Defence here.  See also: “A Mistral-class ship for Canada” by David Pugliese in the […]

Share

The flexibility of amphibious logistical capacity

Dave Shirlaw, Editor and Publisher of SeaWaves Magazine, reports that NDCC Almirante Sabóia (pictured above) of the Brazilian navy left for Haiti on February 1st.  (Photo courtesy of SeaWaves.) This vessel was originally RFA Sir Bedivere (L3004), a member of the British Round Table-class Landing Ships – Logistic (LSL).  She […]

Share

Some comments on numbers, names and notional employment

Cdr. Ken Hansen has published a thoughtful analysis in Canadian Naval Review and followed it up with the most recent contribution to Broadsides.  His analysis suggests that the 250 person Marine Commando Regiment is too small to field and sustain an infantry platoon size force of 32 people. I am […]

Share

Some analysis on hypothetical marine force plans

David Perry’s article, the only one under this discussion topic up until today, remains the most read on the Broadsides forum.  In April, Perry’s article set a new mark for popularity by being read by 314 different visitors to the website.  Normally, the most-read article would record 50 to 60 […]

Share

Who scuttled the “Big Honking Ship”?

Recently, the Globe and Mail reported that the Conservative government has revised its expectations of success in Kandahar. Knowing that the situation on the ground in Regional Command South is ever changing and our military commitment there is evidently slated to end in 2011, such a policy shift may indeed […]

Share

No more ‘honk’ in this ship?

The report of the arrival of France’s F.N. Tonnerre in Halifax should raise some issues for Canada. Tonnerre is a four-in-one vessel – helicopter carrier, hospital ship, command ship, and amphibious ship – that might have been a potential contender for the “Big Honking Ship” once touted by no less […]

Share

The new marine commando regiment

Amidst the hoopla surrounding the leaked Conservative Canada First Defence Strategy and the subsequent series of articles by David Pugliese, one overlooked item was the proposed creation of a 250 member Marine Commando Regiment (MCR) based in Comox, BC. As described by Pugliese, the MCR will be a dedicated maritime […]

Share